Here is a picture of the David C. Cook mansion after it was turned into a retirement center.

Here is a picture as it was originally built.

In 2010 the retirement center was shut down by the city and later foreclosed upon by the bank. Click here to read a newspaper article about the closing.

In 2012 the bank sold a lot of the fancy interior details to Urban Remains in Chicago.

It is the dream of the Gifford Park Association to have the additions taken off of the building with the exterior restored to the origianl look.  The Gifford Park Association has  promised $50,000 from its Housewalk proceeds to help anyone willing to take on the project.   The city of Elgin has a matching $20,000 grant program that could be used to restore the porches, put back missing windows and strip the paint. Homeowners are able to apply three years in a row with different projects.  The program is not guaranteed  because of budget contstraints it is periodially not available.

Because of the marketing efforts by the Gifford Park Association, the foreclosing bank recently found a buyer for the property.  Click here to read about it.

Click here to view the Feasibiltiy study that was paid for by the Gifford Park Association, the City of Elgin, Landmark’s Illinois and The Mutual of Omaha bank.

Click here to view the Gifford Park Association’s Gazette newsletter on the building.

Click here to read a recent article in the Courier about the project.

Click here to view a recent article in the Herald about the project.

Click here to view outside pictures of the building.

Click here to view current interior pictures of the building.

Click here to see the mansions of the same stature as the D. C. Cook mansion that Elgin has lost.

Click here to see a drones view of he roof.

Click here to view a presentation on the history of the David C. Cook Corporation by fourth generation descendants of David C. Cook

Every room on the first floor had encaustic tile floors as seen in this old picture below.

One room had the encuastic tile flooring taken by Urban Remains in Chicago.  We have been told they still have that flooring for sale.

Every room on the second floor has fancy inlaid flooring covering the entire room, not just a border as on most old houses.  The pattern in each room is different. They put plywood over the fancy floor before putting on modern tiles so in a way, the old floors were protected.  No mastic was used on the old flooring so the plywood comes up very easiy.

Click here for more interior pictures showing more of the flooring.

Click here to view pictures of the roof.

Click here to view a drone view of the roof.

Click here to view pictures taken from the roof.

Click here to see the mansion before items were removed. The stained galss window shown was saved because  the preservation ordinance does not allow exterior elements to be removed.

Click here to view pictures of items taken from the David C. Cook mansion that were for sale by Urban Remains.  Most are probably gone.

Click here to see a virtual tour of the Newhall Mansion which was D. C. Cook’s summer home. It is currently a wedding venue.

The two main fireplace mantles that were taken are still for sale at Urban Remains.   The tiles and stained glass were sold separately.